breathe in, breathe out.

christine. intp. writer, dreamer, dancer, wanderer, explorer, lover of life.

love-me-eridan:

welcome-to-fandomonium:

actual-cannibal-emily:

fangsgiving:

i will never ever understand how that is a real bag i cant wrap my head around it

did i just get high

I feel like I just walked into Blue’s Clues. 

how???

love-me-eridan:

welcome-to-fandomonium:

actual-cannibal-emily:

fangsgiving:

i will never ever understand how that is a real bag i cant wrap my head around it

did i just get high

I feel like I just walked into Blue’s Clues. 

how???

(Source: thedaintysquid, via daysoffuturepasta)

2ndratehandjob:

lady-dirtbag:

marchqueen:

tastefullyoffensive:

Portals to Hell by hrmphfft

IT’S BACK

I HAVE BEEN TRYING TO FIND THIS AGAIN FOR MONTHS

I AM SO HAPPY RIGHT NOW

ITS BACK 

(via cute-as-anime)

vilsa:

k-lionheart:

asian:

*tears up*

Get ready for the Disney movies, people.

So I’m reading the article and then this:

 For example, there is the tale of a maiden who escapes a witch by transforming herself into a pond. The witch then lies on her stomach and drinks all the water, swallowing the young girl, who uses a knife to cut her way out of the witch.

German fairytales are so brutal. (I love that)

vilsa:

k-lionheart:

asian:

*tears up*

Get ready for the Disney movies, people.

So I’m reading the article and then this:

For example, there is the tale of a maiden who escapes a witch by transforming herself into a pond. The witch then lies on her stomach and drinks all the water, swallowing the young girl, who uses a knife to cut her way out of the witch.

German fairytales are so brutal. (I love that)

(via camutalmon)

ivy-and-twine:

Industrial designer Scott Summit, of Summit ID, creates incredibly beautiful prosthetic pieces. They are created on a 3D printer, with the user’s other limbs as a point of reference, resulting in beautifully symmetric limbs.  

His philosophy of creating personal and elegant rather than mass-produced, functional pieces really shows through the grace of his work.  

Some of the more beautiful things that come out of this philosophy range from recreating a tattoo that was lost to matching a purse to looking like a piece of sport equipment: whatever is important and personal to the wearer’s life become reflected in their new prosthetic limb. 

(Listen to his Ted Talk here)

(via stealsurlfromabox)

disneyismyescape:

Gaston Showing Off New Fantasyland

(via disneydeviants)

siddharthasmama:

superqueerartsyblog:

Comic about slurs, published in the Galago magazine last summer. 

And this is really how it is. Instead of placing the blame on us and asking why we don’t say anything, ask yourselves instead why you don’t think it’s a problem that it goes unchecked.

(via stealsurlfromabox)

a practical guide to becoming a true pun master

animeteen:

  1. accept that no pun is actually Good, but that the true nature of a good pun is to be so terrible that it becomes good.
  2. say every pun that occurs to you. i’m so serious about this, sometimes the most well received puns will be ones you considered not saying.
  3. ALWAYS laugh at your own puns, even if nobody else is. (especially if nobody else is.)
  4. know that you are hilarious. puns are a limitless resource and you have taken it as your duty to bring this gift to humanity. you are a hero.

(Source: jjbas, via geekywithclass)

trixalla:

2ndhalfoflife:

phillypu:

Sometimes you just have to recharge.image

—-

It’s not that I don’t want to be with friends and chill. I love doing that! But sometimes I just need to have some alone time too!

an Introvert Infographic

One of the best explanations, hands down.

(Source: phillypu, via daanielasm)

bloodyaphorisms:

kateoplis:

Huxley vs. Orwell

the darkest part of this comic is the realization that they were both right

(via daanielasm)

(Source: marlomeekins, via messrprongs)

10 Oscar Nominees Posing with Their Younger Selves {x}

(Source: sageshorty, via bhyonce)

static-nonsense:

[text: So your friend has a chronic illness or disability…]
petticoatruler:

don’t
expect them to be able to go out on a whim
expect them to have lives just like yours
expect them to always be available
demand details of their illness that they haven’t volunteered, ask them nicely and don’t badger
offer help or assistance to make yourself feel like a better person
act as though the disease is catching, repugnant, or disgusting
challenge them to do things they have already told you were impossible
baby them or treat them as though they’re less competent mentally
tell other people about their illness(es)
suggest cures/treatments/holistic practices (since, you know, they probably have already tried it)
Try to relate their problem to your experience - your sprained ankle is nothing like chronic pain, your bout with stomach flu is nothing like IBS, your inability to focus before coffee is nothing like the mental fog that comes with illnesses like fibromyalgia or MS
ever, ever, ever accuse them of faking. ever.
do
understand that some chronic illnesses have good days and bad days, and that there’s no way to predict what’ll happen
be supportive and understand their limitations
ask about dietary or physical restrictions if you are making plans with them
ask about anything that might make things worse for them, and take it into account
tell them that if they need to tell you they can’t do something that you won’t be angry at them for not being able to, and don’t be passive-aggressive about it
remember that they are a person, not an illness
listen to them, ask them questions if you don’t understand something, and remember what they say
I’m sure I’m forgetting something, but this seems like a decent start. Please add your own.

static-nonsense:

[text: So your friend has a chronic illness or disability…]

petticoatruler:

don’t

  • expect them to be able to go out on a whim
  • expect them to have lives just like yours
  • expect them to always be available
  • demand details of their illness that they haven’t volunteered, ask them nicely and don’t badger
  • offer help or assistance to make yourself feel like a better person
  • act as though the disease is catching, repugnant, or disgusting
  • challenge them to do things they have already told you were impossible
  • baby them or treat them as though they’re less competent mentally
  • tell other people about their illness(es)
  • suggest cures/treatments/holistic practices (since, you know, they probably have already tried it)
  • Try to relate their problem to your experience - your sprained ankle is nothing like chronic pain, your bout with stomach flu is nothing like IBS, your inability to focus before coffee is nothing like the mental fog that comes with illnesses like fibromyalgia or MS
  • ever, ever, ever accuse them of faking. ever.

do

  • understand that some chronic illnesses have good days and bad days, and that there’s no way to predict what’ll happen
  • be supportive and understand their limitations
  • ask about dietary or physical restrictions if you are making plans with them
  • ask about anything that might make things worse for them, and take it into account
  • tell them that if they need to tell you they can’t do something that you won’t be angry at them for not being able to, and don’t be passive-aggressive about it
  • remember that they are a person, not an illness
  • listen to them, ask them questions if you don’t understand something, and remember what they say

I’m sure I’m forgetting something, but this seems like a decent start. Please add your own.

(via spoonieproblems)

qaga:

SHEEZUS - THE BATTLE OF THE DIVAS

(via thatshysterekal)

x

(Source: 3dsprincess, via hydrocyanicacid)